Flowers—Lines—Ice

Moonlit: Portrait of an Ice Bubble

Portrait of a Bubble

I know that I’m breaking some composition rules with this one (placing the bubble in the middle, etc.), but I like the dimension and lines offered by the reeds and needles.  I also didn’t want to lose the other bubbles at the edges of the image.  I do have a closer shot of this bubble, but preferred, this time, to see my subject in its environment.

24 responses

  1. I wonder who said such rule. Any how, the center of gravity is 60% upper-left. It was not centralized.
    —– I don’t think you need any rules. If any, break it = you (or the Dharma inside of you) are the Rules.

    By the way, does blue on the photo different from the color-balance-setting to tungsten-light ? —– OR,
    you needed to see a ghost ? 😀 (Be careful, don’t break the ice under the moon lit darkness 🙂 )

    January 20, 2013 at 4:09 pm

    • Thank you very much, Yoshi-sensei for this reminder. I am going to write these very words on my camera strap. 🙂 I don’t have a tungsten-light setting (that I know of… but maybe I should look into that?) (I did, however, slightly adjust light and and boost color in Lightroom). However, I’m always interested in seeing ghosts. 🙂

      January 21, 2013 at 5:27 pm

  2. Beautiful composition! Love the cool tones!

    January 20, 2013 at 5:56 pm

    • Thank you so much. I’m glad you like the composition and tones.

      January 21, 2013 at 5:28 pm

  3. I think it’s a great, dynamic composition. Rules, schmools!

    January 20, 2013 at 9:09 pm

    • Thanks, Richard. Exactly, rules schmools. I’m all for that!

      January 21, 2013 at 5:31 pm

  4. elmediat

    It is very effective. The framing of the subject by the diagonal pieces breaks up the image and draws the eye to the apex point, slightly above centre right. This means the rules work perfectly or that the image works perfectly and the rules can go jump in a pond. Another pond, this one is full of aesthetic wonders that you are capturing with the net of your imagination & keen eye. 🙂

    January 20, 2013 at 11:44 pm

    • Thank you, Joseph. Your explanation helps me understand better why it works. I had to laugh at the idea of the rules going to jump in a pond. If they try this one, they’re going to bonk their heads on the ice! 😀 Maybe I’ll try to capture that.

      January 21, 2013 at 5:34 pm

  5. When I think of composition rules I think about who wrote them, and why they thought they knew what would (or should) please me. I don’t pay any attention to the rules-if a photo pleases me it’s bound to please others, and this one does.

    January 21, 2013 at 11:33 am

    • Excellent way of thinking, Allen. I’ll remember that. Thank you.

      January 21, 2013 at 5:34 pm

  6. Break those rules! If it works, then it works…and it does!

    January 21, 2013 at 1:22 pm

  7. I love this composition. The criss-crossing lines create a nice balance. And yeah, rules are only guidelines. In this case your “eye” was keener than any set of rules!

    January 21, 2013 at 3:02 pm

  8. Rules are meant to be broken 😉

    January 21, 2013 at 6:39 pm

  9. Rules, schmules! It looks just fine, Melanie.

    January 21, 2013 at 11:45 pm

    • I just noticed Richard feels the same way, but spells it differently. 🙂

      January 21, 2013 at 11:48 pm

      • I’ll go with both spellings. Thanks for the encouragement! 🙂

        January 22, 2013 at 8:01 pm

  10. The only thing you need to write on that camera strap is “Keep On Clicking”.

    January 22, 2013 at 4:32 am

  11. Yes, rules be damned…that is a beautiful photograph, Melanie…straight-up beautiful….

    January 22, 2013 at 4:54 am

  12. Goodness, this is a breathtaking image! So many details capture my eyes. Break the rules! Hee hee 🙂

    January 22, 2013 at 10:16 pm

  13. Pingback: Frosted & Iced: How to Make A Canadian Laugh « Dark Pines Photo

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